Changes to the 2015 Tax Code You Should Know

Part 2 of 2

OIC

In addition to changes in the rules surrounding certain deductions, some popular tax breaks were extended this year beyond their initial expiration date. Here’s a look at some of them:

  • Higher education tuition deduction. You may still be able to deduct between $2,000 and $4,000 of qualified tuition expense. This deduction applies to an accredited post-secondary career school, college or university.
  • Energy credits. If you made energy-efficient changes to your home, you’re in luck. Enhancements such as improved insulation and  upgraded energy-efficient heating/cooling systems are eligible for the energy credit.
  • Educator expense deduction. If you are a K-12 teacher who dipped into your own funds for classroom supplies, you’re in luck. You could deduct up to $250.00 in unreimbursed classroom expenses. You must be a full-time teacher and work 900 hours per academic year to be eligible.
  • Commuting tax breaks. If you take mass transit to work, you could be eligible for a tax break much like those who have employer assistance to cover parking costs. The current deduction is $130.00 per month.
  • Deduction for small business equipment purchases of up to $2 million. This will come in handy if you decide to purchase/upgrade your business equipment. Eligible expenses now include computers and work stations.
  • Work Opportunity Tax Credit. If you own a business, good help can be hard to find, and expensive to hire (training and on-boarding expenses for example. However, Uncle Sam has extended the Work Opportunity Tax Credit. You’ll be eligible for a credit equal to a percentage of wages paid if you hire a permanent worker from any one of these targeted groups: TANF, SSI and SNAP clients, qualified veterans, qualified summer youth program members, vocational rehabilitation clients, to name a few.

Understanding changes to the tax code or extension for tax cuts will go a long way during tax season this year. Since each individual tax scenario is different, we recommend that you consult with a qualified tax pro. He or she will answer your questions, help you determine your eligibility for certain deductions and exemptions, and can even file on your behalf.

The start of tax season doesn’t have to mean unanswered questions and last-minute panic. As the old-school expression states, “Forewarned is forearmed.” The more you know in advance, the less likely it is you’ll be caught by surprise on tax day.

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